Gift-Giving in Japan Cash, Connections, Cosmologies by Katherine Rupp

Cover of: Gift-Giving in Japan | Katherine Rupp

Published by Stanford University Press .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Customs,
  • Social & cultural anthropology,
  • Sociology,
  • Japan,
  • Customs & Traditions,
  • Social Science,
  • Social life and customs,
  • National characteristics, Japa,
  • Anthropology - General,
  • Asia - General,
  • Social Science / Customs & Traditions,
  • Ceremonial exchange,
  • General,
  • Gifts,
  • National characteristics, Japanese

Book details

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages264
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7929724M
ISBN 100804747032
ISBN 109780804747035

Download Gift-Giving in Japan

This book is the first in English to document the extraordinary scale, complexity, and variation of giving in contemporary Japan. Gift-Giving in Japan is based on eighteen months' fieldwork in the Tokyo metropolitan area, as well as short-term research in other parts of Japan.

The core of the study is the experience of family representatives of Cited by: Gift-giving is extremely important in Japanese society, not only at personal and household levels, but at the national and macroeconomic levels as well.

This book is the first in English to document the extraordinary scale, complexity, and variation of giving in contemporary Japan. Gift-giving is extremely important in Japanese society, not only at personal and household levels, but at the national and macroeconomic levels as well. This book is the first in English to document the extraordinary scale, complexity, and variation of giving in contemporary Japan/5(8).

Gift-giving is extremely important in Japanese society, not only at personal and household levels, but at the national and macroeconomic levels as well. This book is the first in English to document the extraordinary scale, complexity, and variation of giving in contemporary Japan.

Gift-Giving in Japan is based on eighteen months' fieldwork in the Tokyo metropolitan area, as well as short-term. Gift giving is a common part of Japanese culture. Different types of gifts are given on different occasions as outlined below. Much attention is given to the wrapping of presents.

If not nicely packed, the present should at least be handed over in a bag, preferably a bag by the shop the present was purchased at. Gift giving in Japan is deeply rooted in tradition with gifts given not only for social occasions, but Gift-Giving in Japan book for social obligations -- gifts given when indebted to others, both family and business.

The emphasis is on the act of giving rather than the gift itself. The value of the gift is of less importance than Gift-Giving in Japan book presentation and thoughtfulness in which it is presented.

When I did Gift-Giving in Japan book homestay in Japan years ago, the organization told me that suitable gifts would be Californian wine, chocolate (for example, See's), and, as mentioned, local delicacies.

I am from California and thus the wine and the chocolate made sense. Also, note the Japanese Customs impose restrictions on what you can bring into the country.

According to Japanese custom, this gift-giving thing appears to be self-perpetuating and never ending, but last year we finally agreed not to exchange gifts, because of the high postage costs.

So I didn't send anything but I got a Christmas package from them anyway and hurriedly put together a present for them and sent it off (very late.

The giving of gifts in Japan is so much more than it is in the west. It is a form of social communication with a set of rules all its own. Gifts can be given to say thank you or sorry.

Gifts are also given to people you will be working with that you are meeting for the first time. Anthrop Term Paper Yi Min Yeng (Leon) Katherine Rupp began the study of Japan and Japanese when she was an undergraduate at Princeton University as noted in the Acknowledge portion of the book, Gift-Giving in Japan: Cash, that she had her graduated training in the University of Chicago funded by the National Science Foundation and the University itself.

Japan gift-giving customs have certain rules of etiquette, which are important to follow to avoid any misunderstandings beteen the giver and recipient. Once such custom is how gifts are packaged. On each gift, the giver attaches paper called "noshi" on which the word "oseibo" or "ochugen" is written.

Noshi is a thin and decorative piece of. Gift-Giving in Japan: Cash, Connections, Cosmologies Katherine Rupp. out of 5 stars 3. Paperback. $ Rice as Self: Japanese Identities through Time (Princeton Paperbacks) Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney.

out of 5 stars 2. Paperback. $ Japan in Print: Reviews:   There is a gift-giving custom in Japan that frustrates many foreigners who live here called okaeshi. It is gift-giving as an obligation for having received a gift from someone a return gift.

My first weddings in Japan were surprising while guests usually give generous money gifts to the bride and groom, they leave with a bag full of gifts. Insights into gift giving from The Golden Gift. Gift giving is a very important part of the Japanese culture and communicates respect, friendship and appreciation.

Gift-giving in Japan versus Western cultures Unlike Western cultures, where there is a certain spirit of giving without expecting anything in return — which may or may not be true in practice, of course — gifts in Japan are given and received in a cycle of obligation and gratitude. Gift giving is a great way to strengthen your personal or professional relationship with each other in Japan.

By Yumi Nakata 2 min read On a recent trip back to Japan to visit my family, I was able to see a childhood friend of mine whom I hadn’t seen in over 10 years. O-seibo (year end) and O-chugen (midsummer) are the main gift-giving times. Japanese give gifts to anyone they are indebted to — superiors, subordinates, colleagues, and good clients.

Gifts received are repaid with something of comparable or slightly higher value on a. Christmas is a very large holiday in Japan so as the gift giving season ramps up, we wanted to share with you some authentic Japanese gifts ideas.

There's something for everyone here. Oh, and メリークリスマス(Merry Christmas) is how you say Merry Christmas in Japanese. GIFT GIVING IN JAPAN* - Gift Giving Etiquette BUSINESS GIFT GIVING / PERSONAL GIFT GIVING. GENERAL GUIDELINES. Gift-giving is an important part of Japanese business protocol. Moreover, gifts are exchanged among colleagues on July 15 and January 1.

Gifts and gift-giving ¥ (approx. US$) melon, carefully cultivated and selected for its lack of imperfections, intended as a gift in the Japanese custom of gift-giving. Many people will ask a guest to open a gift, but if they do not, the Japanese will resist the urge to ask if they can open the gift.

In addition to social codes of behavior for formal dinners and religious ceremonies, there is the practice by adults of gift-giving, which many in Japan actually consider a headache. Information About Send Gifts to Japan. Send Gifts From Online Gift Shop To Japan.

There was a time when sending a gift to someone living in Japan was a challenging task, especially from India. You probably had to wait for his or her annual visit, to give them something nice.

But things have dramatically changed now, with GiftsnIdeas. Gift giving is customary in Japan, and if you're visiting Japan from America, whether for business or pleasure, it's appropriate to give small gifts to those that help you.

As an American, you may wonder what types of gifts Japanese women like to receive. While personal tastes are sure to differ, a few things. If you’re traveling to Japan, it can be extremely helpful to learn at least a few key points when it comes to Japanese etiquette (and taboos).

Japanese people are extremely polite and welcoming (one of the best things about visiting Japan), but many travelers worry about accidentally offending them by saying or doing the wrong thing.

"This is my classic gift-giving book. David Sedaris is absolutely brilliant and very funny, but he captures moments of the human condition so perfectly that it resonates with everyone in some way.

Giri is a Japanese value roughly corresponding to "duty", "obligation", or even "burden of obligation" in is defined as "to serve one's superiors with a self-sacrificing devotion" by Namiko is also associated with the complex Japanese values that involve loyalty, gratitude, and moral debt.

This value is so integral to Japanese culture that the conflict between giri and ninjō. Shichi-Go-San (七五三, lit."Seven-Five-Three") is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan for three- and seven-year-old girls and five-year-old (and less commonly three-year-old) boys, held annually on November 15 to celebrate the growth and well-being of young children.

As it is not a national holiday, it is generally observed on the nearest weekend. The DO NOT guide for gift giving in Japan. When you give someone the perfect gift, it shows them that you truly understand them and that you’ve got a really special connection. Anniversaries, birthdays, Valentine’s Day, and Christmas are happy occasions that are made all that more awesome when you receive a gift that is perfect.

Send gift hampers to Japan. gift baskets for delivery to Japan for holidays and special occasions including christmas, new baby, sympathy, birthday and national holidays celebrated in Japan. International Gift delivery in Japan nationwide.

During these two seasons the Japanese give gifts to relatives, teachers, doctors, customers and anyone to whom gratitude should be expressed. In Islamic countries, including most of the Middle East, the major gift-giving holiday is Eid al-Fitr, at the end of Ramadan (July 5 in ).

Traditionally, children receive gifts of money, and alms and. Valentines Day gift-giving in Japan differs from most countries. White Day is a holiday introduced in Japan in the late s. ‘In the News’ Article Introduction: In Japan, Valentine’s Day is slightly different.

Women giving chocolates as a Valentine’s Day gift became popular in theWhite Day was created by a small. Despite living only in our minds and expectations, the unwritten rules of gift-giving govern everything from the office Secret Santa exchange to the family's morning under the Christmas tree.

Problem is, “unwritten” means that gift-giving rules are subject to interpretation—both in our own minds, and in our dealings with others. Is he/she married or single. I assume they teach you here in the US, is this High School. Single Japanese Men often like to exchange Bottles of very, Very Expensive Liquor, Single Malt Scotch, 14 or better at 18 Year Old Scotch.

Or very good Bourb. Get this from a library. Gift-giving in Japan: cash, connections, cosmologies. [Katherine Rupp] -- "Gift-giving is extremely important in Japanese society, not only at personal and household levels, but at the national and macroeconomic levels as well.

This book is the first in English to document. Read: 's Guide to the Best Military Gifts of While coffee and t-shirts might be the running gag of the veteran business world, vetrepreneurs run companies that make all sorts of. In Japan, not giving a new business York, NY: Zed Books.

Bourdieu, P. The difference between gift giving and bribe can follow the one proposed by Graycar and Jancsics [14]. I f you think the art of giving gifts is tricky at home, try making it work abroad.

While you must carefully choose the item itself, the gift’s wrapping is surprisingly important, too, as is the timing. In fact, in many cultures, gift-giving is like a traditional dance—you have to do the steps in order, in time to the music, and without stepping on anyone’s toes for it to be a good.

A feel good story about your son or daughter wanting to help other kids less fortunate then themselves but doesn't know what to do. Then they get the idea of buying a gift to put under the Giving Tree. For this book you can personalize the ch.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate Great book. The Japanese are really into wrapping, both literally, and metaphorically. They wrap their food, manufactured products, people (especially women), words, places, and even sacred relics in layers and layers of - to modern occidental eyes - seemingly superfluous padding, layers, and surfaces.

Hendry points out that sometimes (in my favourite part 5/5(1). Japan is one culture where giving and receiving presents is crucial and now is the summer season of "Ochugen," or gift giving. Some of these corporate gifts do not come cheap. When I read about gift giving in Japan, websites often suggest candies, teas, souvenirs from the area I'm from (however she lived here too so that's not so exciting).

I would like to send her something a bit more personal and substantial while still giving something that isn't totally unusual to send to someone in Japan.

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